The United Nations has set a full list of sustainable development goals (SDGs), out of which the 10th  aims to reduce inequalities. Reducing inequalities is the very first step in planning a sustainable future. However, it is impossible to meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs, when individuals around the world are being denied their rights. When we discuss sustainability, the term itself is defined as:

“the ability to meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs, consisting out of the 3 P’s: people, profit, planet.”

People form an important aspect of sustainability. Putting people on #1 is therefore highly important to us at Freshtable.  People are presented with constant daily biases, on social media, on streets, at school, at work, through jokes and stereotypes. Reflection is the first step an individual can take to achieve equality by fighting biases, unfair treatments and institutional racism. Freshtable is determined to build a community of support and share knowledge on the current injustice system. As mentioned, one of the 3 pillars of sustainability is ‘people’, we believe that everyone should have access to equal opportunities. We are devoted to contributing to further reflection and change. We continue to do so to by accelerating labor market opportunities to statusholders (former refugees), as we believe in inclusivity in every shape and form.

From our corporate strategy to our leadership style and day to day activities, true sustainability is only achieved when equality is set in place first.

Then how are the two elements exactly intertwined beyond the three P-concept? One word: crisis.

The refugee & climate crisis

The refugee crisis and the climate crisis… these two terms have been starred in news headlines more than one could imagine over the past decade. Both topics have increasingly dominated the political agenda separately, however they are more intertwined than one may think.

Global displacement has been growing since 2007. Some of its reasons for this displacement are escape from persecution, unstable political situations, unemployment and natural disasters. Current global politics have failed to support and guarantee justice for displaced people; and even turned to stricter unwelcoming policies. Currently, global displacement is at a record high, with the number of internally displaced people at over 41 million and the number of refugees at nearly 26 million.

FACTS: A vicious circle of migration and climate change.

 

  1. Since 2008, 26.4 million people are forced yearly to leave their homes due to severe weather events
  2. More than 200,000 Bangladeshi people are displaced each year due to river bank erosion
  3. In 2020, 75-250 million people are predicted to not have sufficient access to water in Sub-Saharan Africa.
  4. The impacts of the extreme drought in Syria thatpreceded the 2011 civil war is often cited by climate & security experts as increasing exacerbating tensions, causing severe unrest and forced displacement

As a sustainable inclusive business we feel responsible to do our part and provide a platform to our freshfamily in which social justice topics can be discussed.

As we want to engage with you in our conversation on the climate and refugee crisis and our stance as a social responsible business, we would like to announce our new platform launch next week. In this podcast we invite experts, citizens, fresh-crew members and those interested to participate in a dialogue in which we highlight the high need of discussing this topic. As a sustainable inclusive business we feel responsible to do our part and provide a platform to our freshfamily in which social justice topics can be discussed. More on this in the upcoming week!

Moria, Greece: Currently 13,000 people are left without shelter

Lastly, we want to highlight the current events in Greece and the remarkable work our partners at Movement On The Ground are carrying out. In the past few days we have learned of the horrific fires started in Moria, Europe’s biggest refugee camp (also referred to as village), leaving nearly 13,000 people without shelter. The village was overcrowded to begin with, and no solutions have been proposed to deal with catastrophic consequences of the fire. Most of the people are currently living in inhumane conditions with no alternatives. A situation that even preceded the current state of the village, as the residents were faced with inhumane living conditions under the lockdown period during the COVID-19 pandemic.

How can I help?

European Solidarity is now more important than ever. If you want to aid in any way, please go to www.freshtable.nl/donate or go directly to www.movementontheground.nl and contribute in any way you can.

 

 

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